Eurasian Association in Katong


The Eurasian Association at Ceylon Road is home to the Eurasian Heritage Centre, which showcases the history, lifestyle and culture of Eurasians in Singapore. Special galleries also trace the genealogy of different Eurasian groups and recount the community’s experiences during World War Two.

The Eurasian Association Open House Cultural Day

Eurasian Community House, 139 Ceylon Road

19 Jul 2014 – 27 Jul 2014

19, 20, 26 and 27 Jul : 3pm – 4.30pm, 5pm – 6.30pm

In Partnership with: URA

The Eurasian Experience Tour includes:

1) Guided tour of the 3 galleries of the Eurasian Heritage Centre (max: 20pax)

2) Hands-on learning of a traditional Portuguese Eurasian folk dance (2 dancers)

3) Food tasting of a traditional Eurasian delicacy

Games Station (for children 12 years and below):

– While parents are attending the Eurasian Experience Tour, their children can learn about Eurasian culture in a fun way at our Games Station showcasing traditional games played by Eurasians (including pick-up-sticks, five stones, hopscotch, zero point and card games such as Happy Family and Snap), with a short interactive video and quiz about who are Eurasians.


Singapore Lighthouse Trail

Starting next month, visitors will get the opportunity to explore and learn about some of Singapore’s historic lighthouses in the Lighthouse Trail, organised by the National Heritage Board (NHB) as part of this year’s Singapore HeritageFest.

Lighthouses have been faithfully serving as beacons of light since the 1900s, guiding ships and mariners eager to anchor at Singapore’s harbours.

For the first time, the lighthouses will be open to the public for viewing.

The three lighthouses featured in the upcoming trail includes:

1) Raffles Lighthouse

Raffles Lighthouse.jpg

The Raffles Lighthouse was named after, and dedicated to the memory of, Sir Stamford Raffles, who founded Singapore in 1819. It is located on Pulau Satumu, formerly known as Coney Island, and is the southernmost islet of SIngapore. Standing 23km southwest of Singapore, it is on the South Channel Sea passage and marks the western entrance to the Singapore Strait.

On May 24, 1854, the Raffles Lighthouse Foundation Stone and the Raffles Lighthouse Memorial Tablet were laid by William J. Butterworth, governor of the Straits Settlements. After a masonic ceremony and a celebration with much military fanfare, building started with the help of Indian convicts and other labourers, who served as stone-cutters, blasters and labourers. The lighthouse began operations on Dec 1, 1855 and is still in operation today.

Designed by John Bennet, a civil and mechanical engineer, the structure is a round granite tower with a lantern and gallery attached to a two-storey keeper’s house. The entire structure is painted in white and stands a mere 9.1m above sea level. Mr. Syed Hassan, who currently resides in the tower and helps to maintain it, is the oldest lighthouse keeper in Singapore.

The lighthouse is accessible only by boat, and visitors are only allowed to view it from a distance due to an exclusion zone that surrounds the tower. It will, however, soon be open to the public as part of NHB’s Lighthouse Trail.


2) Sultan Shoal Lighthouse

The Sultan Shoal Lighthouse was built in 1895, and is located on the island of Selat Jurong, in the Western Anchorage of Singapore. The tower is painted white and the roof of the keeper’s house is painted red. It has a mix of Oriental and Victorian design, oddly resembling a two-storey bungalow growing out of the sea.

The lighthouse was one of the key beacons that guided ships approaching Singapore from the West at a time when pirate attacks were rife. There were two loaded rifles with fixed bayonets as well as three swords in the keeper’s office for resisting pirate attacks in its early days. The tower was rebuilt in 1931 to accommodate the installation of more modern lighting equipment.

The lighthouse was automated in 1984 and is currently unmanned.

3) Fullerton Lighthouse

The now-decommissioned Fullerton Lighthouse is situated atop a small white concrete structure on the roof of the Fullerton building. Standing 47.9m above sea level, it is visible to ships 48.3km away.

In 1958, the S$33,000 structure took over the defunct 103-year-old Fort Canning Lighthouse in guiding ships and mariners into the harbour. But its function was hampered in 1980 by the construction of towering buildings at Marina Centre on reclaimed land and the strong lighting background at the waterfront. Its function was taken over by the Bedok Lighthouse, located on top of a block of flats in Marine Parade (now atop Lagoon View condominium in Bedok) and which started operations in 1978.

The Fullerton Lighthouse was acquired by the then Sentosa Martime Museum as a working exhibit. It has since moved to a new location as an artifact near Harbourfront Towers opposite Sentosa.

See more from:


More options for expats in new international schools

When Britain’s Dulwich College opens its doors here in a few months, it will already have waiting lists for some classes.

Gems World Academy Singapore, also opening this year, has launched more classes for certain grade levels.

The new entrants to the international school scene here will join at least three others which started operations or opened additional campuses here in the past five years: Stamford American International School, the Canadian International School and the United World College of Southeast Asia.

Others, such as the Lycee Francais de Singapour (LFS), the German European School Singapore and the Overseas Family School have plans to add campuses or move to larger premises within the next three years.

At French School LFS, demand has grown so much that the current campus at Serangoon had to be extended three times since 1999.

Stamford American has grown from 76 to 2000 over students. EDB estimated that there are more than 30 international schools here. These schools have about 40,000 students as of last year.

– See more at:

Slowdown in big-ticket property deals

Investment sales of real estate are often seen as a gauge of developers and property investors’ confidence in the medium to long-term prospects of the property market. Investment sales of Singapore property – big-ticket deals of at least $10 million –  continued to languish at around $3.5-3.6 billion this quarter so far . The year-to-date tally of around $8 billion is down from around $12-plus billion in the first-half of last year.

Industry player CBRE predicts that this year will end with around $12-15 billion of transactions, while Savills’ forecast is $16-18 billion — significant declines from last year’s $30 billion.

Industry players attribute the lacklustre showing in the first half to the overall cautious sentiment in the Singapore property market following the introduction of the total debt servicing ratio (TDSR) framework. As well, both foreign and local investors are being drawn to overseas markets. The cut-back in Government Land Sales (GLS) also contributed to the pullback in investment sales here.


More temporary usage of State properties

The Singapore Land Authority (SLA) said there is a “growing interest” in the use of State properties for ad-hoc events. Various activities, from fashion shows to product launches, are being held in buildings that are no longer in use.

The SLA has issued 27 Non-Renewable Temporary Occupation Licences (NRTOLs) since last year to those who wished to hold their events at such places.

A popular venue is the former Kallang Airport, which has hosted fashion shows in recent months.  Another 20 State properties are up for rent, including the old Tanjong Pagar Railway Station and several buildings in the Dempsey Road and Bukit Timah areas. The SLA said these properties can be used for fashion shows, location filmings and product launches.

Total Debt Servicing Ratio (TDSR) impact to date

The Total Debt Servicing Ratio (TDSR) was introduced in June 2013 to ensure financial prudence among borrowers and strengthen credit underwriting practices among banks. The ratio determines how much an individual can borrow from the banks.

Under it, total monthly debt payments including home and car loans cannot exceed 60 per cent of the property buyers’ income. These debt payments are wide-ranging and can include home and car loans, study loan, and even credit card debts.

In the private residential market, the impact of the TDSR on sales volume quickly became apparent. There were 482 new units bought in July 2013, a drop of 73.3% compared to 1,806 unit) in June 2013.

In total, 9,115 new homes were bought since the TDSR was implemented – that’s half the amount bought in a year-on-year comparison from Jul 2012 to May 2013.

Analysts we spoke to say the suburban homes were the hardest hit. Numbers compiled by Knight Frank Singapore showed that 63 per cent fewer new homes in the suburbs were bought in the second half of 2013, compared to the first half of the year.

As for prices, the effect of TDSR was seen later that year. The Urban Redevelopment Authority’s residential property price index slipped 0.9% in the fourth quarter of 2013, the first decline in almost two years.

Prices dipped again in the next quarter – this time by 1.3 per cent. making it the largest drop since the second quarter of 2009, when prices fell by 4.7 per cent.

In boosting sales, some developers have turned to cutting prices. One of the latest to join the fray is the Panorama condominium in Ang Mo Kio, which relaunched in May at a median price of about $1,241 per square foot.

That is about 8 per cent lower than the median price when it was first launched in January this year. But property watchers we spoke to say the discounts are typically for bigger or “less prime” units, and developers are unlikely to lower prices across their projects.

Developers may also be creating smaller units, to balance between offering palatable prices for buyers, and maintaining their profit margins. According to figures from CBRE, the median size of units in the suburbs declined from 753 square feet in the third quarter of 2013, to 732 square feet in the first quarter of this year.

The impact of the TDSR was also felt in the private residential resale market. CBRE’s numbers showed that sales volume in the secondary market dropped by 50 per cent in the first half of this year, compared to the same period last year.

But it may be increasingly difficult to find tenants, as the Government tightens its foreign labour controls and more new homes enter the market in the coming months.

The Urban Redevelopment Authority estimates that a total of 18,350 units will be completed this year, while another 21,738 units, excluding executive condominiums, are expected to be completed in 2015.

The Lippo Group boss’s values and determination

Was reading the WEALTH section of BT and was inspired by this article on Mochtar Riady.

You can read more here:

“When I started my banking business I had two choices – to be a successful banker or a good banker. What does it mean to be a successful banker? As long as you make money for the bank and grow it, the successful banker doesn’t care whether credit is given to people or to the casino, or to gambling or drugs. Even environmental damage. They don’t care. “But the good banker takes care of this; every cent of credit has to be in the right direction and to bring benefit to society. That’s a good banker.” His father was sceptical of his banking ambitions. As he told the conference: “My father said – banking is money. You don’t have money, how can you do it? I said – it is trust, not money. Money is an instrument for trust transactions. As long as I have trust, I can be a banker. “My father says – you are a young man with no position in Jakarta. How can you be trusted? I can invite trusted people to be partners.” Herein lies the secret to his business success, as he pithily told the audience to applause: “I know what I do not know.” He added: “When someone says he doesn’t know, you have to look for professionals to run the business. This is the secret. “

SELF-MADE billionaire Mochtar Riady counts among Indonesia’s wealthiest tycoons, yet wealth itself means little to him. Instead, social responsibility – doing good for people and for Indonesia in particular – appears to be uppermost in his mind and his passion. He puts it simply: “Wealth… actually after US$10 million, you just always put zeros at the end. Up to now, I don’t think I can spend more than US$10,000 a month. That means in one year, I only spend about US$120,000 and that’s enough. My wealth means nothing to me. But I hope our company can do something good for society.” Mr Riady is the founder and chairman of the Asian business powerhouse, The Lippo Group. Its corporate tentacles extend into media, real estate, hospitality, energy, information technology, education and healthcare, among others. The group has a presence in over 10 countries in North America and Asia-Pacific, with assets in excess of US$20 billion. Forbes ranks Mr Riady as the sixth wealthiest in Indonesia, with a net worth of US$2.8 billion. In April, Mr Riady kept an audience of corporate and business bigwigs in rapt attention when he made a keynote speech at Credit Suisse’s Global Megatrends Conference. He delivered an account of the rise of his business interests through the years, punctuating it with touches of wry humour and humility. He also spoke to Wealth on the sidelines of the event in Singapore. Tellingly, for instance, he spoke of “status” – not in terms of influence or wealth, as it would normally be defined by most people – when asked what advice he gives to his sons. “Every person has a status,” he told the audience. “Status increases with age. For instance, when I was a boy, my status was the son of my parents. When my mother had a daughter, my status became brother of my sister… Status rises with responsibility. When I was a student I kept in mind that I have to do good things to beautify my parents’ name. In my status as a husband, I try my best to be a good husband to my wife and a good father to my sons… Today my responsibility is how to make my country Indonesia do well.”

Prime Waterfront Homes and Living in Singapore

%d bloggers like this: